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Media Release: Pakistan with a score of 4.1 ranked at 113th out of 129 countries

March 25, 2011 

International Property Rights Index 2011 released
 
Report emphasizes connection between Property Rights and Well-being
 
Nepal, Sri Lanka, Kenya, Algeria perform better than Pakistan; India at 55; Bangladesh consistently at the bottom
 
In Gender Equality for property rights, out of 83 countries Pakistan ranked 69, Bangladesh at 66
 
Lahore March 25, 2011: Alternate Solutions Institute proudly announces the release of the 2011 International Property Rights Index (IRPI) today, which measures the intellectual and physical property rights of 129 nations representing 97 per cent of the world’s GDP. This year, 67 international organizations, including Alternate Solutions Institute from Pakistan, partnered with the Property Rights Alliance in Washington, DC and its Hernando de Soto Fellowship program to produce the 5th annual IPRI.  



International Property Rights Index 2011 released
 
Report emphasizes connection between Property Rights and Well-being
 
Nepal, Sri Lanka, Kenya, Algeria perform better than Pakistan; India at 55; Bangladesh consistently at the bottom
 
In Gender Equality for property rights, out of 83 countries Pakistan ranked 69, Bangladesh at 66
 
Lahore March 25, 2011: Alternate Solutions Institute proudly announces the release of the 2011 International Property Rights Index (IRPI) today, which measures the intellectual and physical property rights of 129 nations representing 97 per cent of the world’s GDP. This year, 67 international organizations, including Alternate Solutions Institute from Pakistan, partnered with the Property Rights Alliance in Washington, DC and its Hernando de Soto Fellowship program to produce the 5th annual IPRI.
 
The IPRI uses three primary areas of property rights to create a composite score: Legal and Political Environment (LP), Physical Property Rights (PPR), and Intellectual Property Rights (IPR). Most importantly, the IPRI emphasizes the great economic differences between countries with strong property rights and those without. Nations falling in the first quintile enjoy an average national GDP per capita of $38,350; more than double that of the second quintile with an average of $18,701. The third, fourth, and fifth quintiles average $9,316, $5,065, and $4,785 respectively. Pakistan falls in the bottom quintile.
 
With regard to Pakistan, in a broader perspective property rights continue to be a challenge. This year Pakistan’s score on the scale of IPRI improved to 4.1 from last year’s 3.9 (out of 10). In terms of ranking, its position is static this year. Last year it was at 104th, this year at 113th but it is due to the increase in the number of countries ranked this year (129 than last year’s 125). In the all three components, Legal and Political Environment, Physical Property Rights, and Intellectual Property Rights, Pakistan recorded slight increases. Its IPRI ranking improved 0.2 points, Legal and Political Environment ranking 0.3, Physical Property Rights 0.2, and Intellectual Property Rights 0.3.
 
After a slight improvement in 2009, Pakistan’s IPRI decreased in 2010, then in 2001 improving a bit again. Out of the 3 components, it is Legal and Political Environment followed by Intellectual Property Rights which drags down Pakistan’s ranking. On the whole, Pakistan’s rank / score stand at: Legal and Political Environment 124 / 2.8; in Physical Property Rights 67 / 6.0; and Intellectual Property Rights 111 / 3.6.
                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Surprisingly, Nepal (100 / 4.4), Kenya (100 / 4.4) and Algeria (107 / 4.3) performed better than Pakistan. Notably, Sri Lanka, by scoring 5.6 ranked at 77th position.
 
In Gender Equality, Pakistan ranked at 69 out of 83 countries. Interestingly, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nepal appear to be lacking in securing property rights to women, and fall in the same group. Bangladesh scored 5.2 and ranked at 66, and Nepal 5.3 and 65. Chad and Zambia were placed at the bottom with 2.1 and 3.4 score, and Singapore and Hong Kong topped with full score.
 
Sweden and Finland grabbed the top position with a score of 8.5, and Venezuela fell to the bottom, 129th position, with a score of 3.4. Bangladesh stood at 125th with a score of 3.6. India was placed at 55th position with 5.6 points. Nepal scored 4.4 points and ranked at 100.
 
Hernando de Soto, whose work in property rights lead to the inception of the IPRI, commented on the 2011 publication: “Weak property rights most commonly seen in the developing world. As the citizens of these countries are in the greatest need of economic growth, it is crucial that their physical and intellectual property be granted protection. This Index seeks to educate politicians, economists, academics, and entrepreneurs about the necessity to protect property rights around the world.”
 
The International Property Rights Index provides the public, researchers and policymakers, from across the globe, with a tool for comparative analysis and future research on global property rights. The Index seeks to assist underperforming countries to develop robust economies through an emphasis on sound property law.
 
For more information and copy of the IPRI 2011, contact the Institute at
info@asinstitute.org
 
For a soft copy of the IPRI 2011, visit: www.internationalpropertyrightsindex.org

 



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