Media Release: Black Coat Revolution Needs To Be Strengthened

Lahore March 18, 2009: The Black Coat Revolution of March 16 which is the manifestation of the will of the people of Pakistan needs to be strengthened. The restoration of Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry, Honorable Chief Justice of Pakistan, to his rightful and lawful position, will ensure the ordinary people of Pakistan their dignity and their fundamental rights. It is tantamount to moving of the Pakistani nation and society in a direction where rule of law, independence of judiciary and supremacy of the constitution will prevail.

Black Coat Revolution Needs To Be Strengthened

Lahore March 18, 2009: The Black Coat Revolution of March 16 which is the manifestation of the will of the people of Pakistan needs to be strengthened. This was stated in a press statement by Dr. Khalil Ahmad, Executive Director Alternate Solutions Institute, first free market think tank of Pakistan. Highlighting the importance of the Black Coat Revolution, Dr. Khalil said, “In Pakistan’s 62 years of history, this revolution is the first victory of the ordinary people of Pakistan. The restoration of Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry, Honorable Chief Justice of Pakistan, to his rightful and lawful position, will ensure the ordinary people of Pakistan their dignity and their fundamental rights. It is tantamount to moving of the Pakistani nation and society in a direction where rule of law, independence of judiciary and supremacy of the constitution will prevail.”

He cautioned, “We need to be on guard against those elements and forces who have been opposing the restoration of Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry, Chief Justice of Pakistan and other deposed judges of the higher courts of Pakistan, and creating hurdles in their reinstatement.” Dr. Khalil further said, “In order to thwart the success of the Black Coat Revolution, the counter revolutionary elements and forces have started conspiring against it. They do not want the status quo of Pakistan to change in favor of the ordinary people. We must foil their attempts to keep the elitist state of Pakistan intact. For this, we should always be vigilant.”

Dr. Khalil highlighted the role of lawyers and civil society who kept the movement alive. He said, “Media, especially electronic media, has come out prominently as an ally of the ordinary people of Pakistan.” He extolled the role of Pakistan Muslim League (N) and especially its leader, Mian Muhammad Nawaz Sharif, who bravely led this revolution to success through the dangers of the Container Politics of Zardari regime. He said, “Other political parties such as Jamat-e-Islami, Tehrik-e-Insaf and various smaller groups also contributed to the success of this movement.” Dr. Khalil disclosed that Alternate Solutions Institute will be celebrating the Black Coat Revolution next week in a befitting manner where it will formally launch its Sign the Charter of Liberty Campaign. This Campaign aims at making the citizens’ fundamental rights, ensured in the Constitution of 1973, inviolable.

Long live the Black Coat Revolution!

Media Release: A. S. Institute Launches “Sign the Charter of Liberty Campaign”

Lahore April 3, 2009: The fundamental rights given in the 1973 constitution be treated as core values and made inviolable. This was demanded in a meeting organized yesterday in a local hotel by the Alternate Solutions Institute, first free market think tank of Pakistan. The meeting was attended by students from various institutions and young people in a large number. At this occasion the Institute formally launched its “Sign the Charter of Liberty Campaign.”


Fundamental rights be made inviolable

A. S. Institute launches “Sign the Charter of Liberty Campaign”

Individual’s rights and freedoms be taken as core values

Supreme Court ought to annul the legislation repugnant to the fundamental rights and freedoms

Democracy cannot flourish without rule of law

Lahore April 3, 2009: The fundamental rights given in the 1973 constitution be treated as core values and made inviolable. This was demanded in a meeting organized yesterday in a local hotel by the Alternate Solutions Institute, first free market think tank of Pakistan. The meeting was attended by students from various institutions and young people in a large number. At this occasion the Institute formally launched its “Sign the Charter of Liberty Campaign.” In a simple ceremony Pervaiz Akhtar, member Board of Advisors of the Institute and Farrukh Shahzad Advocate, a young lawyer, singed the forms containing the demands made in the Charter of Liberty, and kickstarted the campaign.

The Charter of Liberty released last year in October responds to the Charter of Democracy. The 70-page document presents a critique of the Charter of Democracy and is an independent Charter of Liberty also. It seeks to present a solution to the myriad problems and unimaginable sufferings faced by the ordinary people of Pakistan to achieve freedom and prosperity for all its individual citizens.

The Charter asserts that the sole purpose of a constitution is to establish a government to ensure, secure and protect the fundamental inalienable rights of the citizens. These rights include their right to life, liberty, happiness; their freedom to think, express and publish; freedom to assemble, freedom to free exercise of their belief; freedom to trade and business; and their right to justice.

The Charter of Liberty demands that the Constitution of Pakistan be amended by the parliament in such a manner that will bring it in harmony with the Charter of Liberty; and that in the Constitution be inserted a section on the pattern of American Bill of Rights to ensure that no legislation will be made by any government in any manner to expand its powers or to curtail the inalienable rights and freedoms of the people of Pakistan.

Media Release: “The Bases Of Economic Freedom: A Course For The Beginners” Launched

Lahore May 25, 2009: Alternate Solutions Institute, first free market think tank of Pakistan, has launched and successfully completed the first session of its ambitious project, The Bases of Economic Freedom: A course for the beginners. The course aims at teaching and promoting the virtues of fundamental individual rights and economic freedom. The first ever batch consisting of 21 participants was selected from students, teachers, activists and young professionals who were brought to Ayubia for 5 days’ activities.

Media Release

The Bases of Economic Freedom: A course for the beginners, launched

First session of the course comprising 21 participants successfully concluded in Ayubia 

7 day course teaches the virtues of fundamental rights and economic freedom

Lahore May 25, 2009: Alternate Solutions Institute, first free market think tank of Pakistan, has launched and successfully completed the first session of its ambitious project, The Bases of Economic Freedom: A course for the beginners. The course aims at teaching and promoting the virtues of fundamental individual rights and economic freedom. The first ever batch consisting of 21 participants was selected from students, teachers, activists and young professionals who were brought to Ayubia for 5 days’ activities.

The program included lectures, debates and discussions, group work, presentations spanning 8 hours daily, with recreation/excursion on the 5th day. The course consisted of four sessions daily with topics such as Basis of freedom, Basic principles of economics, What is economic freedom, Conditions of economic freedom, Economic and political freedom, economic freedom and prosperity, Democracy and economic freedom, Pakistan and economic freedom. The last segment of the course invites research proposals from the participants to study the economic issue facing Pakistan. This time the proposal from Saima Aslam, Lecturer in Environmental Science University of the Punjab Lahore, was accepted. She will be studying the effects of environmental taxes and regulations on industries in Pakistan for which a scholarship worth Rs.100, 000 will be provided by the Institute.

Dr. Sajid Ali, Chairman Department of Philosophy, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Ali Salman Managing Partner Development Pool Lahore/Director Development Alternate Solutions Institute Lahore, and Dr. Khalil Ahmad Executive Director Alternate Solutions Institute Lahore, acted as Resource Persons. Dr. Khalil Ahmad performed the duties of moderator/facilitator for the course. The funding for the course was provided by Friedrich Naumann Stiftung Pakistan through the Economic Freedom Network Pakistan, a network of like-minded individuals and organizations dedicated to the cause of economic freedom in Pakistan. The Institute hopes to organize the next session of the course in December this year.

Media Release: Pakistan Performs Badly On The Scale Of Economic Freedom, Its Rank Lowered From 104 to 110

Lahore September 14, 2009: Pakistan ranked 110 out of 141 countries this year, after ranking 104 (out of 141 countries) in the last year’s report. In 2008 Report Pakistan scored 6.05 points out of 10; while this year its overall scored fell to 6.01. The areas that caused a decline in Pakistan’s overall performance are: legal structure and security of property rights; access to sound money; and freedom to trade internationally. The areas in which Pakistan slightly improved are: size of government where its score changed from 7.01 to 7.1; and regulation of credit, labor, and business where its overall scored improved to 6.6 from 6.56.


MEDIA RELEASE

Economic Freedom Report 2009:

Pakistan performs badly on the scale of economic freedom
Its rank lowered from 104 to 110
Far behind from India’s rank at 86 and Sri Lanka’s at 105, Bangladesh at 115
Integrity of legal structures and security of property rights decline
Hong Kong and Singapore rated best for economic freedom, Myanmar and Zimbabwe ranked worst
Economic freedom may decline in the short term in response to recession, but over a longer time, economic freedom has a tendency to increase after a banking crisis

Lahore September 14, 2009: The report ranks Hong Kong number one, followed by Singapore then New Zealand. Zimbabwe once again has the lowest level of economic freedom followed by Myanmar and Angola, according to the Economic Freedom of the World: 2009 Annual Report, released today in Pakistan by the Alternate Solutions Institute, Pakistan’s first free market think tank.

This year’s report also includes new research that examines the likely impact of the global recession on levels of economic freedom. It suggests that economic freedom may decline in the short term in response to crises, but over a longer time, economic freedom has a tendency to increase after a banking crisis.

Pakistan ranked 110 out of 141 countries this year, after ranking 104 (out of 141 countries) in the last year’s report. In 2008 Report Pakistan scored 6.05 points out of 10; while this year its overall scored fell to 6.01. The areas that caused a decline in Pakistan’s overall performance are: legal structure and security of property rights; access to sound money; and freedom to trade internationally. The areas in which Pakistan slightly improved are: size of government where its score changed from 7.01 to 7.1; and regulation of credit, labor, and business where its overall scored improved to 6.6 from 6.56.

Pakistan scores in key components of economic freedom (from 1 to 10 where a higher value indicates a higher level of economic freedom):

• Size of government: changed to 7.1 from 7.01 in the last year’s report
• Legal structures and security of property rights: changed to 4.2 from 4.31
• Access to sound money: changed to 6.3 from 6.45
• Freedom to trade internationally: changed to 5.8 from 5.91
• Regulation of credit, labour and business: changed to 6.6 from 6.56

“Economic freedom is vitally important to building prosperity and reducing poverty so the finding that it may increase in the long run following a financial crisis is good news,” said Dr. Khalil Ahmad Executive Director of Alternate Solutions Institute.

The annual peer-reviewed Economic Freedom of the World report is produced by the Fraser Institute, Canada’s leading economic think tank, in cooperation with independent institutes in 75 nations including the Alternate Solutions Institute in Pakistan.

The Economic Freedom of the World report uses 42 different measures to create an index ranking countries around the world based on policies that encourage economic freedom. The cornerstones of economic freedom are personal choice, voluntary exchange, freedom to compete, and security of private property. Economic freedom is measured in five different areas: (1) size of government; (2) legal structure and security of property rights; (3) access to sound money; (4) freedom to trade internationally; and (5) regulation of credit, labor and business.

Research shows that individuals living in countries with high levels of economic freedom enjoy higher levels of prosperity, greater individual freedoms, and longer life spans. This year’s report also contains new research showing the impact of the global recession on levels of economic freedom.

“Economic freedom is the key building block of the most prosperous nations around the world. Countries with high levels of economic freedom are those in which people enjoy high standards of living and personal freedoms. Countries at the bottom of the index face the opposite situation; their citizens are often mired in poverty, are governed by totalitarian regimes and have few if any, individual rights or freedoms,” said Dr. Khalil Ahmad Executive Director of the Institute.

The full report is available at www.freetheworld.com

Economic Freedom and the Global Recession

The 2009 edition of the Economic Freedom of the World report includes new research that examines the likely impact of the global recession on levels of economic freedom.

The study looked at banking crises that took place in Norway and Sweden during the 1990s and found that although economic freedom may decline in the short term in response to crises, over a longer time, economic freedom has a tendency to increase after a banking crisis. In the case of Norway and Sweden, the banking crisis did not distract these countries from continuing with their market-based reform policies.

“Even though a banking crisis can be very painful, it is an illusion that they can be fully ruled out by better government regulation. In fact, a case can be made that perverse regulations in combination with the creation of too much liquidity played a key role in the creation of the current crisis,” said Fred McMahon, director of the Centre for Globalization Studies at the Fraser Institute.

“The short-term response of governments will almost surely reduce economic freedom but history shows that this need not be the case over the long term. Several countries that have experienced financial crises have moved toward greater economic freedom in subsequent years. The impact on economic freedom depends on what we learn from the crisis. Will we move toward institutions and policies more consistent with economic freedom? Or will we politicize, micromanage, and expand the size and role of government? If we choose to follow the latter route, our destiny will be like the generation of 1930; we will face a lost decade of stagnation and decline.”

About the Economic Freedom Index

Economic Freedom of the World measures the degree to which the policies and institutions of countries are supportive of economic freedom. This year’s publication ranks 141 nations representing 95% of the world’s population for 2007, the most recent year for which data are available. The report also updates data in earlier reports in instances where data have been revised.

For more information on the Economic Freedom Network, data sets, and previous Economic Freedom of the World reports, visit www.freetheworld.com

Contact Alternate Solutions Institute at info@asinstitute.org

Media Release: New Study demands Education Voucher Scheme be expanded to other districts

Punjab Education Foundation’s Education Voucher Scheme in Lahore benefiting disadvantaged families

Lahore November 7, 2009: An independent study of the Education Voucher Scheme conceived and implemented by Punjab Education Foundation in under-developed areas of Lahore shows that Milton Friedman’s idea of education voucher has been picked up and applied in its true spirit, and finds the Scheme satisfactorily working and producing desired results in Pakistan.

Punjab Education Foundation’s Education Voucher Scheme in Lahore benefiting disadvantaged families

Lahore November 7, 2009: An independent study of the Education Voucher Scheme conceived and implemented by Punjab Education Foundation in under-developed areas of Lahore shows that Milton Friedman’s idea of education voucher has been picked up and applied in its true spirit, and finds the Scheme satisfactorily working and producing desired results in Pakistan.

The report Liberate to Learn: A Study of the Education Voucher Scheme in Lahore was released here in Lahore today on November 7, 2009. On this occasion, the author of the Report, Ali Salman said, “It is an innovative and path-breaking research.” Dr. Khalil Ahmad, Executive Director of the Institute, pointed out, “It is the first ever such a study of the Education Voucher Scheme (EVS) conducted by the Alternate Solutions Institute, a non-profit, non-governmental educational and research organization. The findings of the Study are positive and generally endorse the EVS.”

However, despite all that is good about the Lahore EVS, the present Study notes that the Scheme has not been expanded as it could and should have been, and for the last 15 or so months the number of students benefiting from the scheme remains the same. This requires that the Scheme be urgently expanded to other cities where the disadvantaged people really need it.

We at the Institute hope that this Study will be taken in earnest both by the Federal and Provincial governments, especially the government of Punjab, and private sector, and the scope of education vouchers will be extended to the disadvantaged people throughout Pakistan.

Also, we hope that this Study will inspire the philanthropists to come forward to take up the provision of education voucher and spread it to wherever it is urgently needed.

Let us join hands to liberate the disadvantaged people to learn!

 

Title of the book: Liberate to Learn: A Study of the Education Voucher Scheme in Lahore

Author: Ali Salman

First edition: November 2009

Pages: 70

Price: Rs.150

For inquiries and orders, contact:

Phone / Fax: 042 – 3577 54 15

Handset: 0303 – 4000 161

Email address: info@asinstitute.org

Postal address: P. O. Box No. 933, GPO, Lahore-54000

Office address: Room No. 32, 3rd Floor, LandmarkPlaza, Jail Road, Lahore

Media Release: Hum-Azad.Org Goes Online Today

Alternate Solutions Institute’s Urdu website, Hum-Azad.org goes online today

Hum-Azad.org to promote rule of law, fundamental rights, limited government, market economy and freedom with responsibility
Lahore November 14, 2009: Alternate Solutions Institute, Pakistan’s first free market think tank, launches its Urdu website, http://Hum-Azad.org, today in Lahore. In conjunction with its English website, http://asinstitute.org, Hum-Azad.org will be promoting the values of limited government, rule of law, protection of property rights, market economy, individual freedom, and private initiative to a larger number of Urdu-reading audience.


Alternate Solutions Institute’s Urdu website, Hum-Azad.org goes online today

Hum-Azad.org to promote rule of law, fundamental rights, limited government, market economy and freedom with responsibility
Lahore November 14, 2009: Alternate Solutions Institute, Pakistan’s first free market think tank, launches its Urdu website, http://Hum-Azad.org, today in Lahore. In conjunction with its English website, http://asinstitute.org, Hum-Azad.org will be promoting the values of limited government, rule of law, protection of property rights, market economy, individual freedom, and private initiative to a larger number of Urdu-reading audience.
The new website aims at serving as the biggest portal where the literature related to Classical Liberal ideas, themes, and values will be made available in Urdu. Here Classically Liberal texts will be posted for the benefit of Urdu reading audience. In addition, content from the English website will also be regularly posted in Urdu.
Ken Schoolland’s The Adventures of Jonathan Gullible: A Free Market Odyssey which has already been translated into 45 languages of the world, was published in Urdu in 2003 by the Institute. It was the first ever book on market philosophy in Urdu. Its 2nd edition was printed last year which is now available on Hum-Azad.org for free.
The technical and financial support for this project is being provided by the Atlas Global Initiative for Free Trade, Peace and Prosperity.

Media Release: New Study Reveals The Importance Of Economic Freedom For Development In Pakistan

Market and policy integrated with rule of law can bring well-being to all
As economic freedom and well-being are shown closely related for all income levels, granting economic freedom should precede poverty alleviation programs
Lahore December 3, 2009: An empirical study of the two sample districts of Punjab (Bahawalpur and Sialkot), conducted by Ali Salman on behalf of the Alternate Solutions Institute, shows that merely guaranteeing social opportunities, which has been the mantra of almost all development practitioners (such as Amartya Sen) as well as aid granting agencies, and poverty alleviating agencies in Pakistan, does not lead to either well-being or freedom. In the absence of rule of law, all investments in the well-being end up decreasing freedom of individuals as well as of nations.


Market and policy integrated with rule of law can bring well-being to all
As economic freedom and well-being are shown closely related for all income levels, granting economic freedom should precede poverty alleviation programs
Lahore December 3, 2009: An empirical study of the two sample districts of Punjab (Bahawalpur and Sialkot), conducted by Ali Salman on behalf of the Alternate Solutions Institute, shows that merely guaranteeing social opportunities, which has been the mantra of almost all development practitioners (such as Amartya Sen) as well as aid granting agencies, and poverty alleviating agencies in Pakistan, does not lead to either well-being or freedom. In the absence of rule of law, all investments in the well-being end up decreasing freedom of individuals as well as of nations.
The Report Well-Being and Freedom at Crossroads: An Empirical Inquiry into Development was released here in Lahore today on December 3, 2009. On this occasion, the author of the Report, Ali Salman said, “Poverty is not about earning levels, it is about inability to absorb shocks. Also, without rule of law, the governance structure becomes a black hole, in which all the development is vacuumed.”
Dr. Khalil Ahmad, Executive Director of the Institute, pointed out, “The findings of this study challenge the very rationale of Pakistan’s poverty alleviating strategies, which have constantly been failing as the number of those who are below the Poverty Line, instead of decreasing, has increased.” He further said, “Though this study focuses only on two districts of Punjab, it amply shows the overall inefficacy of government initiatives in reducing poverty.”
The Study finds that people in rural areas welcome economic freedom i.e. market based reward structure when it comes to pricing of agriculture output as a very effective instrument to promote well-being. Farmers are ready to give up subsidies on inputs i.e. seeds and fertilizers as long as their output can receive a market price.
The main recommendation of the Study can be worded thus:
Let economic freedom prevail and the people will alleviate their poverty on their own!
 
Title of the book: Well-Being and Freedom at Crossroads:
                               An Empirical Inquiry into Development
Author: Ali Salman
First edition: November 2009
Pages: 70
Price: Rs.160
For inquiries and orders, contact:
Phone / Fax: 042 – 3577 54 15
Handset: 0303 – 4000 161
Email address: info@asinstitute.org
Postal address: P. O. Box No. 933, GPO, Lahore-54000
Office address: Room No. 32, 3rd Floor, Landmark Plaza, Jail Road, Lahore

Media Release: In Property Rights, Pakistan 104th Out Of 125 Countries

International Property Rights Index 2010 released

Pakistan ranks at 104th out of 125 countries

Nepal better than Pakistan; India at 53; Bangladesh consistently at the bottom

In Gender Equality for property rights, Pakistan ranks 68 out of 80 countries

Piracy accounts for the entire music market in Pakistan

Lahore February 23, 2010: Alternate Solutions Institute is proud to announce the release of the 2010 International Property Rights Index (IRPI) today, which measures the intellectual and physical property rights of 125 nations representing 97 per cent of the world’s GDP. This year, 62 international organizations, including Alternate Solutions Institute, partnered with the Property Rights Alliance in Washington, DC and its Hernando de Soto Fellowship program to produce the 4th annual IPRI.


International Property Rights Index 2010 released

Pakistan ranks at 104th out of 125 countries

Nepal better than Pakistan; India at 53; Bangladesh consistently at the bottom

In Gender Equality for property rights, Pakistan ranks 68 out of 80 countries

Piracy accounts for the entire music market in Pakistan

Lahore February 23, 2010: Alternate Solutions Institute is proud to announce the release of the 2010 International Property Rights Index (IRPI) today, which measures the intellectual and physical property rights of 125 nations representing 97 per cent of the world’s GDP. This year, 62 international organizations, including Alternate Solutions Institute, partnered with the Property Rights Alliance in Washington, DC and its Hernando de Soto Fellowship program to produce the 4th annual IPRI.

The IPRI uses three primary areas of property rights to create a composite score: Legal and Political Environment (LP), Physical Property Rights (PPR), and Intellectual Property Rights (IPR). Most importantly, the IPRI emphasizes the great economic differences between countries with strong property rights and those without. Nations falling in the first quintile enjoy an average national GDP per capita of $35, 676; almost double that of the second quintile with an average of $20, 087. The third, fourth, and fifth quintiles average $9,375, $4,699, and $4,437 respectively.

The findings of the IPRI 2010 show that countries with stronger property rights tend to have a higher per capita income and attract more Foreign Direct Investment (FDI).

With regard to Pakistan, property rights continue to be a challenge. This year Pakistan’s score on the scale of IPRI fell to 3.9 from last year’s 4.0 (out of 10), and its rank slid down to 104 (out of 125 countries) from last year’s 90 (out of 115 countries). In the two components, Legal and Political Environment, and Physical Property Rights, Pakistan performed badly, whereas in the third component, Intellectual Property Rights, its position remained unchanged. In the regional ranking (Asia and Oceania region with19 countries), Pakistan stood at 18 with Bangladesh at 19.

Actually after a slight improvement in 2009, the Pakistan’s IPRI decreased in 2010. The LP score decreased for the second consecutive year. While the Rule of Law and Control of Corruption scores remained largely unchanged in 2010, the Judicial Independence and Political Stability scores decreased dramatically. Political Stability for Pakistan ranked the lowest of the scored countries in the index. PPR increased in 2009, but the situation with respect to physical property rights regressed in 2010. Access to Loans fell 0.6 points, while expert opinion of the protection of physical property rights slightly improved.

For Pakistan though the IPR score did not experience a net change in 2010, but this result is misleading. The Protection of Intellectual Property Rights score decreased 0.6 points. The Copyright Piracy score increased, but this change was only because there were no data for piracy of records and music in 2010. From 2007 to 2009, however, it is estimated that piracy accounted for the entire music market in Pakistan.

In Gender Equality, Pakistan ranked at 68 out of 80 countries. Interestingly, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh and Nepal appear to be lacking in securing property rights to women, and fall in the same group. India scored 5.1 with a ranking at 67, Bangladesh 5.2 with 65, and Nepal 5.3 with 64. Chad was placed at the bottom with 2.1 score, and Uruguay topped with full score.

Finland grabbed the top position with a score of 8.6, and Bangladesh fell to the bottom with a score of 2.6. India was placed at 53rd with 5.5 points. Nepal scored 4.0 points and ranked at 101.

Hernando de Soto, whose work in property rights lead to the inception of the IPRI, commented on the 2010 publication: “The fourth edition of the IPRI reveals encouraging signs of improvement in some countries, while also bringing attention to disturbing trends in others.”

The International Property Rights Index will provide the public, researchers and policymakers, from across the globe, with a tool for comparative analysis and future research on global property rights. The Index seeks to assist underperforming countries to develop robust economies through an emphasis on sound property law.

For more information and copy of the IPRI 2010, contact the Institute at
info@asinstitute.org

Media Release: “Green” Subsidies Are Costly for Taxpayers and the Environment – New Study

Lahore September 01, 2010: A study “Seven Myths About Green Jobs,” published in association with more than two dozens think tanks from all over the world, including the Alternate Solutions Institute from Pakistan, concludes that Green Jobs are not that Green as is being claimed by the Green politicians and advocates. The study reveals the hidden costs of so-called “green investments,” bringing a key policy of various governments into question. The study shows that subsidizing “green jobs” wastes resources and reduces growth without necessarily protecting the environment.


 Lahore September 01, 2010: A study “Seven Myths About Green Jobs,” published in association with more than two dozens think tanks from all over the world, including the Alternate Solutions Institute from Pakistan, concludes that Green Jobs are not that Green as is being claimed by the Green politicians and advocates. The study reveals the hidden costs of so-called “green investments,” bringing a key policy of various governments into question. The study shows that subsidizing “green jobs” wastes resources and reduces growth without necessarily protecting the environment.

Governments around the world have recently laid out plans to pour taxpayers’ money into “green investments,” claiming that the high costs will be offset by long-term benefits to the economy and the environment. The new study finds that this “win-win” attitude is a delusion. Even the UN admits that a ‘full-fledged [global] green transition’ could cost trillions of pounds. Hidden costs include:
Bureaucracy: In practice, “green investment” gets spent on red tape. “Green jobs” are taken by bureaucrats, siphoning resources away from the productive sectors of the economy.
Waste: For those advocating “green jobs”, inefficiency is a virtue. A United Nations study on green jobs actually calls for fruit to be picked by hand rather than machine. “Green” subsidies effectively pay companies to make everyday items more expensive and scarce, taxing the public twice over.
Debt: Today’s “green investments” are made by increasing national debt, borrowing heavily in the hope of making future generations richer. If the green gamble fails, our children and grandchildren will be left with the bill.
“Green investment” isn’t even a reliable way to improve the environment, the study finds. Steel is one of the world’s most carbon-intensive industries, yet the United Nations Environment Program counts steelworkers as having “green jobs,” because steel is needed to make wind turbines.
Seven Myths About Green Jobs
By Andrew P. Morriss, William T. Bogart, Andrew Dorchak and Roger E. Meiners

Media Release: Economic Freedom Suffers A Setback In Pakistan

Pakistan’s ranking downed from 110 to 118 with score lowering from 5.95 to 5.80
Lack of Economic Freedom major cause of homicide, unemployment
Recession caused global decrease in Economic Freedom
Pakistan far behind from India’s rank at 87, and Rwanda’s at 90
Sri Lanka, Bangladesh perform better at 111, 113

Lahore September 20, 2010: This year’s report, released today in Pakistan by the Alternate Solutions Institute, shows that economic freedom experienced its first global downturn in a quarter century, with the average score falling to 6.67 in 2008 (the most recent year for which data is available) from 6.74 in 2007. Of the 123 countries with economic freedom rankings dating back to 1980, 88 (71.5 per cent) saw their rankings decrease while only 35 (28.5 per cent) recorded increases.


Pakistan’s ranking downed from 110 to 118 with score lowering from 5.95 to 5.80
Lack of Economic Freedom major cause of homicide, unemployment
Recession caused global decrease in Economic Freedom
Pakistan far behind from India’s rank at 87, and Rwanda’s at 90
Sri Lanka, Bangladesh perform better at 111, 113
Lahore September 20, 2010: This year’s report, released today in Pakistan by the Alternate Solutions Institute, shows that economic freedom experienced its first global downturn in a quarter century, with the average score falling to 6.67 in 2008 (the most recent year for which data is available) from 6.74 in 2007. Of the 123 countries with economic freedom rankings dating back to 1980, 88 (71.5 per cent) saw their rankings decrease while only 35 (28.5 per cent) recorded increases.
Pakistan ranked 118 out of 141 countries this year, while its last year’s ranking stood at 110. As compared to its score of 5.95 in 2009, this year its score fell to 5.80. The areas that caused a decline in Pakistan’s overall performance are: legal structure and security of property rights; access to sound money; freedom to trade internationally; and Regulation of Credit, Labor, and Business. The only area where Pakistan improved substantially is: size of government with its score (rank) going up from 7.14 (40) to 7.71 (21).
Pakistan’s score and rank in 5 key areas of economic freedom (from 1 to 10, where a higher value indicates a higher level of economic freedom and a higher ranking a lower level of economic freedom) as follows:
•          Size of government: improved from 7.14 (40) to 7.71 (21)
•          Legal structures and security of property rights: lowered from 4.70 (91) to
            4.58 (92)
•          Access to sound money: lowered from 6.26 (110) to 5.40 (118)
•          Freedom to trade internationally: lowered from 5.47 (106) to 5.35 (106)
•          Regulation of credit, labour and business: lowered from 6.37 (73) to 6.12 (89)
The Report shows that individuals living in countries with high levels of economic freedom enjoy higher levels of prosperity, greater individual freedoms, and longer life spans. This year’s report also contains new research showing the impact of economic freedom on the rates of unemployment and homicide: increases in economic freedom do appear to be associated with decrease in homicide and unemployment rates.
The Report also shows that countries with more economic freedom have substantially higher per-capita incomes, higher growth rates. Life expectancy is about 20 years longer in freer countries. People living in countries with more economic freedom report more life satisfaction. With fewer regulations, taxes, and tariffs, economic freedom reduces the degree of corruption. (Continued on P.2)
The annual peer-reviewed Economic Freedom of the World report is produced by the Fraser Institute, Canada’s leading public policy think-tank, in cooperation with independent institutes in 80 nations and territories, including the Alternate Solutions Institute from Pakistan.
The Economic Freedom of the World Report uses 42 different measures to create an index ranking countries around the world based on policies that encourage economic freedom. The cornerstones of economic freedom are personal choice, voluntary exchange, freedom to compete, and security of private property. Economic freedom is measured in five different areas: (1) size of government, (2) legal structure and security of property rights, (3) access to sound money, (4) freedom to trade internationally, and (5) regulation of credit, labor, and business.
The full report is available at www.freetheworld.com and www.asinstitute.org.
International rankings
Hong Kong maintains the highest level of economic freedom worldwide, with a score of 9.05 out of 10. The other top scorers are Singapore (8.70), New Zealand (8.27), Switzerland (8.08), Chile (8.03), the United States (7.96), Canada (7.95), Australia (7.90), Mauritius (7.82), and the United Kingdom (7.81).
Zimbabwe maintains the lowest level of economic freedom among the 141 jurisdictions analyzed, followed by Myanmar, Angola, and Venezuela.
Several countries have improved their relative levels of economic freedom over the past three decades: Ghana climbing to a score of 7.17 from 3.27 in 1980; Uganda to 7.15 from 3.42; Peru to 7.36 from 4.27; Israel to 6.86 from 3.79; and Turkey to 6.91 from 3.95.
Over the same period, economic freedom has regressed in many other countries: Venezuela fell to 4.35 in 2008 from a score of 6.29 in 1980; Zimbabwe to 3.57 from 4.93; Myanmar to 3.49 from 4.84; Malaysia to 6.71 from 7.07; and Nepal to 5.44 from 5.75.
About the Economic Freedom Index
 
Economic Freedom of the World measures the degree to which the policies and institutions of countries are supportive of economic freedom. The 2010 report was prepared by James Gwartney, Gus A. Stavros Eminent Scholar Chair at Florida State University; Robert A. Lawson, Auburn University; and Joshua Hall, Beloit College. This year’s publication ranks 141 nations representing 95% of the world’s population for 2008, the most recent year for which data is available.
For more information on the Economic Freedom Network, data sets, and previous Economic Freedom of the World reports, visit www.freetheworld.com